Connect with us

News

Forget Witchcraft; Here Is Why You Walk And Talk In Your Sleep

Published

on

The National Sleep Foundation defines Sleep talking, formally known as somniloquy, as a sleep disorder of talking during sleep without being aware of it. Sleep talking can involve complicated dialogues or monologues, complete gibberish or mumbling. The good news is that for most people it is a rare and short-lived occurrence.

From the foundation’s findings, anyone can experience sleep talking, but the condition is more common in males and children. “Sleep-talkers are not typically aware of their behaviors or speech; therefore, their voices and the type of language they use may sound different from their wakeful speech. Sleep talking may be spontaneous or induced by conversation with the sleeper.” National Sleep Foundation.

According to the foundation, Sleep talking may be brought on by stress, depression, sleep deprivation, day-time drowsiness, alcohol, and fever. In many instances sleep talking runs in families, although external factors seem to stimulate the behavior. Sleep talking often occurs concurently with other sleep disorders suchas nightmares, confusional arousals, sleep apnea, and REM sleep behavior disorder. In rare cases, adult-onset frequent sleep-talking is associated with a psychiatric disorder or nocturnal seizures. Sleep talking associated with mental or medical illness occurs more commonly in persons over 25 years of age.

A sleep specialist however sheds some light onto why sleep talking is unpleasant. “What freaks people out the most about sleep talking: People typically don’t remember doing it when they wake up. And the voices and language a person uses while sleep talking might be different from their typical speech habits. So when people like Rosenberg record their sleep musings, it’s pretty hilarious to hear back. Anyone can experience sleep talking, but it’s more common in men and children. Sleep walking and sleep talking occurs in roughly 25 percent of children and then around one percent of adults, so it’s not like it’s this unbelievably rare type of scenario,” Michael Breus, sleep specialist.

Share
Continue Reading
Click to comment

Drop your comment(s) concerning this post, let's know what you think about it. God bless!.

News

COVID-19: Scammers dressed as doctors, set up fake Coronavirus testing sites, where they charge people $240 and steal their DNA

Published

on

Local officials said a self-proclaimed medical marketing company set up makeshift testing sites outside various churches in Louisville with workers dressed head to toe in hazmat gear. They claim the scammers charge $240 a test and steal people’s DNA and personal information.

At one site in Louisville, Kentucky, scammers dressed as doctors were offering fake coronavirus tests out of a convenience store parking lot in exchange for $240. They were also collecting credit card information and people’s social security numbers, equipping them to steal their victims’ identities.

Local authorities told the NYT that 100 people fell prey to the scheme before the scammers fled

Metro Council President David James and Louisville advocates have been hunting down who they call fake COVID-19 testers, reported WDRB.

“It’s really Medicaid fraud, is what it actually is. There is no reason that you should spend $240 dollars for a COVID test,” James said. “And they’re using the same gloves on Person A that they used on Person B, that they used on Person C.”

The officials said the group may be from Illinois as they believe the scammers are the same people who claimed to test people’s DNA for diseases last year.

“They’re the scum of the Earth and they’re preying on the poorest of the poor, and I’m going to do everything in my power to get them the [explicit] out of Kentucky,” James said.

Share
Continue Reading

Trending